Incorporating games into the classroom can help students learn more effectively.

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Buxton has entered her Atherton, California, students in the competition for the second year in a row in order to increase their understanding of global ecosystems while also cultivating a feeling of community and camaraderie among their fellow classmates.

We will never know what occurs when a gorilla engages in fight with a brown hyena in an Australian rain forest, but it is a fascinating mystery.

As Maya Buxton's high school biology students participate in March Mammal Madness (MMM), a virtual game inspired by the annual NCAA basketball tournament, they will learn about the importance of biodiversity and endangered animals. MMM is an effort to educate students in the United States about the significance of biodiversity and endangered animals.

Buxton has entered her Atherton, California, students in the competition for the second year in a row in order to increase their understanding of global ecosystems while also cultivating a feeling of community and camaraderie among their fellow classmates.

According to Buxton and other educators, however, gaming at school is about more than simply having a good time. It is also about learning. Learning is becoming progressively enhanced via the usage of games and gaming ideas. Game titles ranging from Minecraft to the Game of Life and Werewolf are included in March Mammal Madness. These games are an effective way to link content with low-stakes competition and can help to foster a more collaborative, engaging classroom environment—particularly for students who struggle to concentrate or find their niche in learning. The use of video games has also shown to be an effective method of keeping children interested and motivated throughout an outbreak that has lasted for several years.

These statements are based on more than just anecdotal evidence. According to research, introducing games into the classroom can help to increase student engagement, enhance social and emotional learning, and encourage students to take risks in their learning. One study examined the popular multiple-choice quiz game Kahoot, which came to the conclusion that it improved students' attitudes toward learning while simultaneously enhancing their academic achievement. Studies have also revealed that virtual games can help children with ADHD improve their focus and attention, and that virtual games can also help children with dyslexia improve their spatial and temporal attention, which can translate into better reading skills.

Games, on the other hand, cannot be used to play tic tac toe replace other forms of instruction. In the same way that any other educational tool is used, they must be carefully planned and only included when they are directly relevant to the learning objectives.

Games, according to Antero Garcia, an assistant professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Education who studies the impact of technology and gaming on youth literacy and civic identities, should be viewed as "a pedagogical approach that might help people think differently about what's possible... limited only by a player's imagination and by what a gaming set of rules allows." According to Garcia, "It's vital to realize that games aren't merely for amusement purposes."

Whether you want to add fully-fledged games into your lessons, or just a few gaming components into them, the choice is yours. The approaches listed below should be taken into consideration while developing games as a good teaching tool.

IMPROVING THE ABILITY OF STUDENTS TO COME TOGETHER

However, despite the fact that students can play educational games on their own, most games encourage players to work effectively in groups, which is a necessary building block for developing strong relationships and life skills such as cooperation that will be useful as they progress through school and into adulthood, according to research.

The Menlo School's Douglas Kiang, a high school computer science lecturer at the Menlo School, says that these social ties have shown to be extremely important during distance learning. Kiang has provided kids with the chance to connect with one another while learning social skills such as cooperation, bargaining, and respect for others through the use of the game Minecraft. Since the transition to virtual classrooms last spring, Kiang has utilized Minecraft to provide kids with the chance to engage with one another while also learning social skills such as cooperation, bargaining, and respect for others, among other things. Additionally, he plays in the game Among Us with his advisory group, which is comprised of around ten other students.

The expert in game-based learning and technology integration, Kiang says, "I believe that games are beneficial in that regard because they allow kids to bond with one another while also engaging and conversing with one another." Kiang is a nationally recognized expert in game-based learning and technology integration.

It is not always necessary, according to Cameron-Jarvis, to incorporate additional community-building components into your classroom by utilizing a multiplayer video game in the classroom, but it is recommended. She proposes that questions be placed in the stream of popular programs such as Google Classroom, Flipgrid, and Nearpod, and that students be given the opportunity to remark, discuss, and debate ideas with one another and with the teacher in real time. While in class, other teachers have used Google resources to construct their own versions of traditional games such as Connect Four or Tic Tac Toe in order to offer students with a mental break from academic study.

In the opinion of Cameron-Jarvis, one of the most important components of incorporating games into the classroom is to avoid gamifying everything and to start small by including games with rules that children can understand. Farber goes on to say that the variety of games is also crucial, and that instructors should attempt to include a variety of activities in their courses. As an alternative, he suggests that you "examine the sensations that those games produce in addition to the strategy and skill" if you do allow pupils to play games in class.

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